Nudging Leads to Consumers In Colorado To Shop But Not Switch ACA Marketplace Plans

Nudging Leads to Consumers In Colorado To Shop But Not Switch ACA Marketplace Plans

Nudging Leads to Consumers In Colorado To Shop But Not Switch ACA Marketplace Plans (Health Affairs 2017open access version here, joint with Jon Kingsdale, Timothy Layton, and Adam Sacarny)

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) dramatically expanded the use of regulated marketplaces in health insurance, but consumers often fail to shop for plans during open enrollment periods. Typically these consumers are automatically reenrolled in their old plans, which potentially exposes them to unexpected increases in their insurance premiums and cost sharing. We conducted a randomized intervention to encourage enrollees in an ACA Marketplace to shop for plans. We tested the effect of letters and e-mails with personalized information about the savings on insurance premiums that they could realize from switching plans and the effect of generic communications that simply emphasized the possibility of saving. The personalized and generic messages both increased shopping on the Marketplace’s website by 23 percent, but neither type of message had a significant effect on plan switching. These findings show that simple “nudges” with even generic information can promote shopping in health insurance marketplaces, but whether they can lead to switching remains an open question.

When Consumers Do Not Make an Active Decision: Dynamic Default Rules and their Equilibrium Effects

Dynamic Defaults

Dynamic defaults for recurring purchases determine what happens to consumers enrolled in a product or service who take no action at a decision point. Consumers may face automatic renewal, automatic switching, or non-purchase defaults. Privately optimal dynamic defaults depend on the contributions of adjustment costs versus psychological factors leading to inaction: both produce inertia under renewal defaults, but differ under non-renewal defaults. Defaults have equilibrium effects on pricing by changing the elasticity of repeat demand. Socially optimal defaults depend on firms’ pricing responses as well; more elastic repeat demand restrains price increases on repeat customers and can reduce inefficient switching.

(Latest draft here. Older: NBER Working Paper 20127).

 

See also discussion in The Incidental Economist.

 

 

When Consumers Do Not Make an Active Decision: Dynamic Default Rules and their Equilibrium Effects

When Consumers Do Not Make an Active Decision: Dynamic Default Rules and their Equilibrium Effects

Dynamic Defaults

Dynamic defaults for recurring purchases determine what happens to consumers enrolled in a product or service who take no action at a decision point. Consumers may face automatic renewal, automatic switching, or non-purchase defaults. Privately optimal dynamic defaults depend on the contributions of adjustment costs versus psychological factors leading to inaction: both produce inertia under renewal defaults, but differ under non-renewal defaults. Defaults have equilibrium effects on pricing by changing the elasticity of repeat demand. Socially optimal defaults depend on firms’ pricing responses as well; more elastic repeat demand restrains price increases on repeat customers and can reduce inefficient switching.

(Latest draft here. Older: NBER Working Paper 20127).

See also discussion in The Incidental Economist.